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My Top 7 Favourite Birding Sites in the Western Cape | Callum Evans

Updated: Oct 1, 2020

South Africa’s Western Cape province is world-renowned for being one of the most biologically diverse places in the world, first and foremost for housing the fynbos biome, the smallest and richest of the world’s floral kingdoms. There are spectacular blooms of spring flowers along the west coast and where two ocean currents meet just off the shores of Cape Agulhas, Africa’s southernmost tip. I sometimes have trouble believing that I live in this place, where you can be watching whales one minute and then a herd of eland the next. I’ve lived in Cape Town for most of my life, but it has only since I’ve taken up birding over the last 5 years that I’ve been able to explore this province’s natural (and sometimes unnatural) wonders. Much of this has been possible through becoming a member of the UCT Birding Club, with whom I have been able to travel from the Tankwa Karoo all the way out onto the Atlantic Ocean and have seen some truly remarkable birds along the way.


Out of all of these places I’ve have been to, a few have really stood out to me as being truly memorable places for birdwatching. This list of my top seven favourite birding sites in the Western Cape draws on my own experiences in these places, what I have learned from my peers in an attempt to provide a basic guide to these places. Some of these sites, like Rooiels and Bettys Bay, are on this list because of a few special birds, and others, like West Coast National Park, because of the sheer number and diversity of species that can be seen there. While there are dozens of other birding sites across the Province that are not listed here, that does not mean that these places are not worth visiting. This is the humble opinion of one birder.


7. Tankwa Karoo Loop

The landscape surrounding the Tankwa Karoo National Park on the south-western edge of the Nama Karoo Desert is one of the driest and least-welcoming landscapes in the country. Yet despite this, it is home to a surprising number of bird species, several of which are endemic to the subregion. One of the best routes to take is to travel past Worcester on the N1 and take the R46 turnoff before turning right off that onto the R355, which runs all the way north to Calvinia. This road takes you past Karoopoort, Eierkop, Skitterykloof and the P2250 track, which leads to the National Park, all of which are greats stops to see the ‘special’ birds of the Karoo. I’ve only been lucky enough to travel this route once with two friends, but it was an amazing introduction to Karoo birding.


Karoopoort is essentially the entrance to the Karoo, and the R355 travels alongside a reed-fringed riverbed through a gap in the southern Swartruggens mountains. Even on the R46 leading there, Rufous-eared Warbler, Rock Kestrel, and Southern Black Korhaan can be seen. The reed beds lining the river on the R355 are ideal for Namaqua Warbler, which is easy to hear, but more difficult to see (we only had fleeting glimpses). Fairy Flycatcher (which was a lifer for me) is also common in the acacia trees growing in the valley, as is Chestnut-vented and Layard’s Tit-Babbler, White-backed Mousebird, Long-billed Crombec, and Grey-backed Cisticola. Once the R355 leaves the mountains behind, the landscape becomes relatively flat and featureless, which makes Eierkop (one of two hills by the roadside) stand out. It is one of the best spots to look for Karoo Eremomela (although we saw them by the roadside too), and Cape Penduline Tit, Malachite Sunbird, and Grey Tit can also be seen here. The Karoo Chat is probably the most common bird along the road, although the further north you drive, the Tractrac Chat takes over. Karoo Korhaan is another bird to look out for here, and it is also possible to see Yellow-bellied Eremomela and Brown-throated Martin here. The Pale-chanting Goshawk is probably the most common raptor here and, if you’re lucky, Martial Eagle can also be seen in the area.


The turnoff to Skitterykloof Pass, which is right at the foot of the Swartruggens Mountains on the very edge of the Karoo, is on the left-hand side close to the Tankwa Padstal. The rocky hillsides on either side of the entrance to the pass are where I saw my first Cinnamon-breasted Warbler, which exists in only a few scattered locations in South Africa and Namibia. A boggy vlei fringed by reedbeds extends from the valley out into the Karoo and supports some birds you wouldn’t expect to see in the Karoo, like African Snipe, African Reed Warbler, Three-banded Plover, Red-knobbed Coot, and Levaillant’s Cisticola. Other birds that I’ve seen in the vicinity include European Bee-eater, Karoo Lark, Mountain Wheatear, Fairy Flycatcher, White-throated Canary, Rock Kestrel, Jackal Buzzard, and Black-headed Canary.


The turnoff for the P2250, the road which leads to the Tankwa Karoo National Park, is situated in one of the most barren landscapes in the region, but it can still produce a significant number of bird species. Capped Wheatear, Karoo Korhaan, Spike-heeled Lark, Karoo Lark, and Large-billed Lark are all common here, as are Pale Chanting Goshawk and Greater Kestrel. Pririt Batis and White-backed Mousebird can be found in the acacia bushes lining the dry riverbeds, and flocks of Namaqua Doves can be seen by the road. While I was unable to see Burchell’s Courser, Ludwig’s Bustard, Black-eared Sparrow-lark or Namaqua Sandgrouse there, this road is still a great place to see these birds, especially in spring after the rains.

Cinnamon-breasted Warbler
Cinnamon-breasted Warbler

The turnoff for the P2250, the road which leads to the Tankwa Karoo National Park, is situated in one of the most barren landscapes in the region, but it can still produce a significant number of bird species. Capped Wheatear, Karoo Korhaan, Spike-heeled Lark, Karoo Lark, and Large-billed Lark are all common here, as are Pale Chanting Goshawk and Greater Kestrel. Pririt Batis and White-backed Mousebird can be found in the acacia bushes lining the dry riverbeds, and flocks of Namaqua Doves can be seen by the road. While I was unable to see Burchell’s Courser, Ludwig’s Bustard, Black-eared Sparrow-lark, or Namaqua Sandgrouse there, this road is still a great place to see these birds, especially in spring after the rains.

6. Cape Point Nature Reserve

On the